It is a responsibility to adopt a dog. It’s expensive, time consuming and very demanding. For your efforts, you get a companion that can be an endless source of fun. On the dog’s end, he gets to have a loving home for the rest of his life.

To ensure that your relationship with your dog would a rewarding experience, take a look at the following considerations before adopting a dog.

How Much Time Do You To Spare?
Consider your newly adopted dog a new kid in your household. It demands maintenance, ample attention and plenty of time. Having a busy schedule does not work very well alongside taking care of a dog. If you think you don’t have enough time for yourself, you probably shouldn’t adopt a dog. Most dogs, even puppies, end up in animal shelters because their owners lack the time to take care of them.

Should You Choose A Puppy Or An Older Dog?
Most owners think that puppies are their best options when adopting a dog. These are much easier to train because they haven’t developed bad habits yet. Puppies can grow with their kids. And so on.

Wrong. Not because you are working with a clean slate does it mean that a puppy will not turn out as a piece of work. Unless you are adopting a puppy that has been sheltered by a rescue group or one that can be taken directly from its original owner, you should be wary about adopting a very young dog. Only rescue groups keep tab of their dogs’ sources, observe their temperament, and investigate into their dogs’ history. The rest just give them temporary foster homes.

Puppies are also not advisable for adoption because they are too young to show their true temperament, behaviors, and features. You also can’t approximate how much training, grooming, and medical attention the dog will likely need.

On top of these, most puppies in animal shelters have had rough beginnings. This means that they have been through tough emotional, mental and physical stresses which could take a long time to erase. They need more than a cozy place to stay; they need thorough attention and care. Unless you are ready to fully commit yourself to the rehabilitation of a puppy, you should settle for a more mature dog.

Having said that, mature dogs in animal shelters are the ideal dogs to consider for adoption. You already have everything you need to know about the potential dog. Well, almost.

How Much Dog Activity Can You Handle?
Some dogs are content with nibbling your shoes; others need more than rough exercise. There are dog breeds that are made to be active outdoors while others can sit idle on your carpet for hours. Either way, you should pick a dog that matches your activity level. If you love being outdoors, you should prefer large or mid-sized dogs that are known for their high level of activity. For generally low-activity level households, breeds with lower exercise needs are ideal. Taking this precaution saves you troubles and your dog, boredom.

Can you shoulder the expenses?
Dogs are quite expensive to maintain. Apart from shelling out bucks to cover the cost of adoption, there are also the routine expenses for grooming, medical expense, training, and others.

Check out some great recipes:

Bow Wow Biscuits

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Canine Meat and Grain Menu

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Darlene’s Favorite Dog Cookie

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Alfalfa Hearts

Alfalfa Hearts 2 cups whole wheat flour 1/2 cup soy flour 1 teaspoon bone meal — optional 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon lecithin — optional 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 3 tablespoons alfalfa sprouts — chopped 1... [Read more]

Breath Busters Biscuits

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Chicken Flavored Dog Biscuits

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Baker’s Bagels

Baker’s Bagels 1 cup whole wheat flour 1 cup unbleached flour 1 package yeast — 1/4 ounce 1 cup chicken broth — warmed 1 tablespoon honey 1. Preheat oven to 375°. 2. In large bowl combine the whole wheat flour with the yeast. Add 2/3... [Read more]

Bacon Bites

Bacon Bites 3 cups whole wheat flour 1/2 cup milk 1 egg 1/4 cup bacon grease — or vegetable oil 1 teaspoon garlic powder 4 slices bacon — crumbled 1/2 cup cold water Mix ingredients together thoroughly. Roll out on a floured surface to 1/2... [Read more]

Bone Bonanza

Bone Bonanza 1/2 pound ground beef — uncooked 1/4 cup chicken broth 1/3 cup black beans, cooked — mashed 1/3 cup cottage cheese 1 teaspoon soy sauce Combine ground meat and chicken broth in a bowl. Add the black beans and cottage cheese. Add... [Read more]

Dixie’s Delights

Dixie’s Delights 1 ripe banana 1/2 cup peanut butter 1/4 cup wheat germ 1/4 cup unsalted peanuts — chopped In a small bowl, mash banana and peanut butter together using a fork. Mix in wheat germ. Place in refrigerator for about an hour until,... [Read more]