It’s easy to just come out with all the good things about the French bulldog. First off, their very lovable, doesn’t require much space, is very loyal, playful and a good companion, and is a breed that can serve both as an effective watchdog and a family member. See, what’s not to love about them? But it’s not as easy as it may seem. Although they seem to be the perfect choice, they certainly have their flaws, and there are different issues when raising them.

At the very beginning, buying a French bulldog would require you to cough up a huge wad of cash. It is a known fact to many dog breeders that the French bulldog commands a higher price tag than many other dog breeds. That’s why there are a number of dog breeders that tend to make money by breeding their French bulldogs and sell off the litter. The problem with this is that a French bulldog’s litter doesn’t produce much, the common number would be about 3 to 4 pups per litter.

Also, breeding the French bulldog is not as easy as it would be with other breeds. There is always the need to have n extensive knowledge and loads of information about their breeding process. This doesn’t mean though that only professionals can do it, but arming yourself with the proper knowledge will make the process easier and help you avoid in making it a hit and miss affair. Plus, you should only breed French bulldogs that possess good qualities. Although there is not much population in the French bulldog community, it is imperative to ensure that the population retains its high standards. This alone elevates the prestige of owning such a breed.

Inbreeding should also be avoided. With such a small population and minor differences, it can be easy to mistakenly breed different types of French bulldogs. So it is imperative that the linage of the particular French bulldog is known initially. Researching is just a part of becoming a responsible breeder. To be one, it is important to acknowledge the fact that you need help. If you don’t have the experience and the knowledge just yet, asking for help is not only acceptable, but also highly recommended.

A professional breeder will inform you of the stringent restrictions that they apply when breeding French bulldogs. This will include ensuring that the breeding standards are met. Also, if the dog does not meet the standard, they should be spayed or neutered. This may sound harsh, but it’s the only way to ensure that the quality is kept. And if you plan on selling some of your litter, you should ensure that their new owners would not breed them if the dog does not meet the standard.

A written agreement should be drawn up. The dogs are categorized into two; they could either be pet dog standards or show dog standards. This two should not be bred together.

Check out some great recipes:

Dog Oil Supplement

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Champion Cheese & Veggies Chews

Champion Cheese & Veggies Chews 1/2 cup grated cheese — room temp. 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 3 teaspoons applesauce 1/2 cup vegetables — what ever you like 1 clove garlic — crushed 1 cup whole wheat flour nonfat milk Mix cheese,... [Read more]

Bread Machine Dog Biscuits

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Chow Chow Chicken

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Beef Twists

Beef Twists 3 1/2 cups flour, all-purpose 1 cup cornmeal 1 package unflavored gelatin 1/4 cup milk 1 egg 1/4 cup corn oil 1 jar Baby food, meat, beef, strained 1 beef bouillon cube 3/4 cup boiling water — or beef stock Dissolve bouillon cube in... [Read more]

Aunt Bianca’s Dog Biscuits

Aunt Bianca’s Dog Biscuits 2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour 1/2 cup nonfat dry milk powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 egg — beaten Flavoring: Meat drippings, broth or water from canned tuna (enough to make a stiff dough). Combine flour, powdered... [Read more]

Canine Cookies #2

Canine Cookies #2 1/2 cup nonfat dry milk 1 egg — well beaten 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/4 cups wheat flour 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon onion salt 1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar 1/2 cup water 6 tablespoons gravy 2 jars baby food,... [Read more]

Dog Biscuits #4

Dog Biscuits #4 2 3/4 cups whole wheat flour 1/2 cup powdered milk 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1 egg 6 tablespoons vegetable oil 8 tablespoons water — (8 to 10) 2 jars Babyfood, Meat, Beef, Strained — *see Note Mix all ingredients... [Read more]

Canine Cookies #1

Canine Cookies #1 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup powdered milk — non-fat 1/3 cup bacon grease — *see Note 1 egg — lightly beaten 1 cup cold water In a bowl, combine flour and milk powder. Drizzle with melted... [Read more]

Canine Carrot Cookies

Canine Carrot Cookies 2 cups carrots — boiled and pureed 2 eggs 2 tablespoons garlic — minced 2 cups unbleached flour — *see Note 1 cup rolled oats 1/4 cup wheat germ *or rice flour or rye flour. Combine carrots, eggs and garlic. Mix... [Read more]